Secondary boycotts page 2 of 3

27 articles are classified in All Articles > Legal > Secondary boycotts



Police charge CFMEU's Setka with blackmail

Victoria Police have today charged CFMEU construction and general division Victorian branch secretary John Setka and his deputy Shaun Reardon with blackmail, for allegedly pressuring concrete supplier Boral over its relationship with the builder Grocon.


CFMEU to pay up to $9m to settle Boral action

The CFMEU construction and general division Victorian branch will pay up to $9 million in damages and costs to Boral and has given an undertaking that it won't renew its blackban on the company's concrete supplies, under a settlement deal announced today.

Boral entitled to present evidence on the extent of its losses

Boral Resources has had an early win in its court battle with the CFMEU over damages caused by concrete bans, with the Victorian Supreme Court overruling objections from the union, and allowing the company to plead a wide range of evidence on the losses it suffered.

Boral CFMEU litigation could set costs and damages record for IR law

Boral says it is seeking at least $20 million in damages in its secondary boycott case against the CFMEU, and has already rejected a $2.4 million settlement offer, in a case set for four weeks hearing with heavyweight legal teams on both sides.

Boral wins access to CFMEU documents as damages case looms

Victoria's Supreme Court has compelled the CFMEU to give Boral access to documents, including transcripts of interviews by competition watchdog the ACCC, to assist with its multimillion dollar damages claim for the union's bans on its concrete supplies, which will be heard next month.

High Court rejects CFMEU's bid to oust tort of intimidation

The High Court has refused the CFMEU special leave to challenge last year's Victorian Court of Appeal finding that the Boral group could rely on the tort of intimidation to recover millions in damages for concrete supply bans.

Ban agreement clauses that inhibit use of contractors: Lawyer

A leading silk has told a gathering of major employers that the federal government should adopt the Harper competition review's recommendation to outlaw agreement clauses that limit employers' use of contractors and labour hire employees.