Entitlements and standards page 11 of 42

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Court lowers bar for roster allowances

Employers are not automatically entitled to reduce roster allowances when working hours fall below an agreement's "indicative" threshold, a court has found.


ROC halts probe into HSU secretary's payout

The Registered Organisations Commission has closed an inquiry into the HSU's Tasmanian branch after failing to identify any legal breaches.

Store owner fined for withholding $450,000 in union dues, super

The Federal Circuit Court has levelled a $75,000 fine and is expected to order more than $25,000 in compensation against the director of a liquidated supermarkets enterprise who withheld about $450,000 in union dues, superannuation and Easter rates from more than 200 employees.

"Casual" employee entitled to annual leave: Court

In a decision sure to be closely analysed by employers, a court has ruled that a worker is entitled to accrued annual leave despite being paid a casual loading for 15 years.

No leave accrual during lockout, says FWC

In a landmark ruling, the FWC has held that Carter Holt Harvey employees did not accrue annual or long service leave during a 74-day lockout last year.


Uber not an employer, says FWC

An Uber driver's failure to convince the FWC that he is an employee is unlikely to deter other challenges according to an academic, while the case raises questions as to whether traditional legal tests can be applied to the gig economy.

Liquidation costs block workers' access to FEG payments

Two employees have had to forego more than $9000 in redundancy entitlements after the FWC accepted a financially-distressed employer could not meet the cost of liquidating his business in order to qualify for the federal government's Fair Entitlements Guarantee scheme.

Labor wins penalty rates ploy in Senate, but loses key ally in House

Labor's audacious bid to restore penalty rates in the retail and hospitality sectors by piggy-backing one of the Federal Government's own IR bills fell at the first hurdle today, when rebel Nationals MP George Christensen indicated he could not support legislation that failed to protect businesses from back-pay claims.