Bullying page 13 of 15

143 articles are classified in All Articles > Discrimination and equity > Bullying


HR manager loses adverse action case

A part-time HR manager's bullying claim against her chief executive backfired when her employer discovered while investigating her complaint that she had been using its resources to do work for other organisations.

Bullying solution: choose your line managers well

A senior member of the Fair Work Commission has told employers they need strong workplace conduct policies and grievance procedures and should select line managers with good interpersonal skills, to help them prevent bullying claims.

Law firm predicts industrial action, productivity, next on agenda

A new report from a major employment law firm predicts that the Senate will pass the Abbott Government's Fair Work Act and building industry amendments, suggests the next reforms will be limits on industrial action and productivity requirements for enterprise agreements, and highlights the lower than expected activity in the FWC's anti-bullying jurisdiction.


Oracle case sets new standard for sexual harassment compensation

In a watershed anti-discrimination ruling, a full Federal Court has found community standards now demand higher compensation for non-economic loss in s--ual harassment cases, and has increased a former Oracle manager's overall damages award from less than $20,000 to $130,000.


Lawyer loses adverse action, bullying case

A court has found that a law firm acted quickly to investigate claims of harassment by one of its solicitors and was entitled to treat emails from her stating that the employment relationship had broken down as a resignation.


Employee's dismissal ends bullying claim

The Fair Work Commission has dismissed an ANZ employee's application for an anti-bullying order, finding that his dismissal by the bank after he lodged his claim meant that he had no reasonable prospects of success.

Bullying ruling should relieve employer fears, lawyers claim

A major law firm says the FWC's first ruling on the merits of a bullying application should calm employers' fears about the new jurisdiction, claiming that the tribunal has adopted "an extremely broad" interpretation of the exemption for reasonable management action.