Overtime, penalties and loadings page 3 of 11

101 articles are classified in All Articles > Compliance > Overtime, penalties and loadings


Economics professor underpaid workers, claims FWO

In its pursuit of a former economics professor for allegedly paying his employees as little as $10 an hour, the FWO is also seeking an injunction to restrain him from future breaches.

Underpaying medical service to cough up $300,000

A company providing first aid services at major events has been fined $250,000 for underpaying casuals after a medical certificate attesting its sole director was "unfit for work/school" over a five-day period that included the court hearing failed to secure an adjournment.

Two jobs don't add up to overtime: Court

In a significant decision on multi-hiring arrangements, a court has ruled that an Australia Post employee holding two "separate and distinct" part-time positions could not base overtime and other entitlements on combined hours.

Hefty fine reinforces weight given to workers' records of hours

The ramifications of recent legislative changes requiring employers to disprove employees' records of hours worked in wage claim cases have been spelt out in a court decision imposing penalties of more than $120,000 on a company and its director for underpaying an apprentice.


Serial wage thieves taken to the cleaners for $510,000

The husband and wife team behind a cleaning business have been hit with a record $510,840 penalty for underpaying three Taiwanese working holiday visa holders $11,500, a Federal Circuit Court judge dismissing concerns about their ability to pay despite an outstanding bill of $343,000 from a previous prosecution for identical contraventions.

Court to rule tomorrow on penalty rates

A full Federal Court will tomorrow hand down its ruling on the union bid to quash the Fair Work Commission's decision to cut penalty rates in the retail and hospitality sectors.

Race-based underpayments a new prosecution frontier for FWO

In the FWO's first underpayment prosecution relying on race discrimination prohibitions in the Fair Work Act, a court has found a Tasmanian hotel and its manager deliberately short-changed a head chef and kitchen hand and expected them to work long hours, six days a week because of their Malaysian nationality and Chinese race.


Full court penalty rates review begins tomorrow

The union movement's crucial bid to overturn the cuts to penalty rates in the retail and hospitality sectors kicks off tomorrow before a rare five-judge full Federal Court.