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42 articles are classified in All Articles > Workplace policy > Email/internet/social media


Counsellor sealed own fate after "flogging": FWC

The FWC has highlighted the pitfalls for workers who opt to resign rather than risk reputational damage from being sacked, in a case in which it says it would have deemed any dismissal unfair.

Abortion tweet to test extent of employer control

In a case likely to test whether an employer can argue one of a position's inherent requirements is not to publicly attack a business partner, a former manager will claim Cricket Australia took adverse action by sacking her for tweeting criticism of the Tasmanian Liberal Party's abortion policies.


Union officials say they were unlawfully bugged

Former union leader Julie Bignell is among of a group of senior elected officials and employees of Together Queensland who have complained to the ROC and privacy commissioner over alleged unlawful and unauthorised covert in-house surveillance of their emails and keystrokes during a protracted merger process completed three years ago.

Social media post had sufficient nexus with workplace: FWC

In an important ruling on out-of-hours conduct, the FWC has found that an employer didn't need to receive a complaint before investigating then sacking a worker for sharing a p--nographic video via social media with friends who included 19 male and female work colleagues.

Sharing explicit images breached Coles' conduct rules: FWC

The FWC has found a Coles Supermarkets baker who texted explicit images to a manager who responded "great d--k pic" did not sexually harass him as he appeared to initially take them as "a joke", but the tribunal has upheld his dismissal as his behaviour breached the retailer's code of conduct.



Shifting policy sands could catch out APS social media posters

Restrictions on APS employees posting anti-Government messages on social media under new guidelines could lead to workers unwittingly exposing themselves to sanction as policies shift on issues such as marriage equality, according to an IR academic.