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Vegan beliefs protected under UK workplace equality laws

In the wake of the UK's employment tribunal ruling that "ethical veganism" is a protected philosophical belief in the workplace, a Seyfarth Shaw partner says that there might be scope under state and federal discrimination laws to advance a similar claim in Australia.

Bench corrects "counter-intuitive" compensation ruling

A tribunal member "counter-intuitively" refused to award compensation to an unfairly dismissed employee after failing to assess financial loss and wrongly asserting that she had admitted to competing priorities, an FWC full bench has found.

Parental leave more flexible under new legislation

The Morrison Government has this morning introduced legislation to increase flexibility in taking the federally-funded paid parental leave entitlement of 18 weeks and has also introduced a Bill to consolidate inactive and low-balance super funds.

FWC deep-dives on nature of work

The importance of 'choice versus direction' in determining whether employees are working or not has been highlighted in an FWC decision considering the case of boat masters and crew having their unpaid meal breaks interrupted to assist passengers on multi-day dive trips.

$10K for manager sacked while on sick leave

A home improvement company had a valid reason to sack a business manager who recklessly approved credit for a struggling customer, but the FWC has held that its process in dismissing him while on sick leave rendered it unfair.

Strike injunction threatens MUA's anti-automation campaign

DP World Australia's legal action to block protected industrial action by the MUA has emerged as a major test of the union's new policy to control the introduction of automation on the waterfront.

Bank not in deal breach despite IT worker's cloud-based fears

An IT specialist with a major bank has failed to persuade the FWC that deployment to a new cloud-first role represented an agreement breach because it placed unreasonable demands on his fading capacity to learn.

Tech giant can't retrospectively cap sales commissions: Court

Hewlett Packard must pay an overperforming sales executive more than $370,000 to honour a decade-old unpaid bonus, after the technology giant failed to establish that it can retrospectively cap commissions if employees substantially exceed targets.