Interpretation page 1 of 4

35 articles are classified in All Articles > Awards > Interpretation


FWC deep-dives on nature of work

The importance of 'choice versus direction' in determining whether employees are working or not has been highlighted in an FWC decision considering the case of boat masters and crew having their unpaid meal breaks interrupted to assist passengers on multi-day dive trips.

Meatworker seeks $125K after alleged job trim

A meatworker is suing his employer for more than $125,000 as part of an adverse action claim that it took him off knife-work and reduced his position because he sought to recoup years of alleged underpayments.

HR manager's "vague" knowledge of employees' work hinders deal

A major employer has failed to apply the correct award in seeking approval for a new enterprise agreement covering two businesses, the FWC noting an HR manager involved in bargaining had "little to no knowledge" of the work performed by employees.

Split FWC bench upholds contentious labour hire deal

The CFMMEU has been refused permission to appeal the approval of a labour hire company's deal on the basis the black coal award incorporated in the predecessor agreement did not allow for casual production and engineering workers, a majority FWC bench finding it possible the provision's absence was "simply overlooked" by the employer.


Union, employer wrangle over correct award in overtime dispute

As the FSU and Travel Money Oz head to conciliation next Thursday over claims that the currency exchange business owes workers for unpaid overtime including attendance at "buzz nights", the parties are already at loggerheads over award coverage.

Actors fluff portrayal as employees

Three actors in a government-commissioned theatre production have failed to convince a court that they were employees engaged on "sham" contracts, rather than independent contractors.



Pickers to test vulnerable workers laws

Five migrant fruit pickers at the centre of a $10 million Federal Court claim against a labour hire company and its owners are seeking to be recognised as casuals, alleging their contracts for piecework were invalid and based average take home pay on an unrealistic workload.